Study Shows What Living In A “Greener” Neighborhood Can Do For Your Health

Study Shows What Living In A “Greener” Neighborhood Can Do For Your Health By Kalee Brown for Natural Blaze

  • The Facts: A study published in The Lancet Planetary Health Journal titled “Urban greenness and mortality in Canada’s largest cities: a national cohort study” reveals just how beneficial living close to or within nature can be.
  • Reflect On: How much time do you spend in nature?

If you’ve ever experienced living in both a downtown core as well as a suburb full of greenery, the juxtaposition is pretty astounding. Many of you reading this probably could have guessed that living around nature is better for your health, because many of us simply feel better when we’re outdoors.

Do you ever feel like you just need to go lay in the grass, or go outside for a breath of fresh air? I live in a busy downtown core, so I definitely feel the hustle and bustle becomes a little too much for me sometimes. But my ‘quick fix’ is always to head to the park and chill in the grass, and I’m definitely not the only person who feels this way!

A new study recently proved just how beneficial living close to or within nature can be, as living in a greener neighbourhood can actually lower your risk of early death.

Study Finds Living in a Greener Neighborhood Can Improve Your Health

A recent study published in The Lancet Planetary Health Journal titled “Urban greenness and mortality in Canada’s largest cities: a national cohort study” revealed just how beneficial living close to or within nature can be.

Researchers at the University of New Brunswick collected data on 1.3 million non-immigrant Canadian adults living in the 30 largest cities in the country. The data analyzed was dated from 2001-2012, and the researchers measured the amount of greenery around the participants’ houses, from giant trees to tiny shrubs.

Their findings suggest that the more greenery people live around, the lower their risk of premature death. “There was a lot bigger effect than I think any of us had been expecting,” explained Dan Crouse, a health geographer and lead author of the study.

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