The Battle Cry of Isaiah — Awake and Arise!

The Battle Cry of Isaiah — Awake and Arise! by Shane Idleman

A battle cry is used to summon armies to war. A loud, unified shout could intimidate the strongest of enemies. Confidence in battle often tilts the scale toward victory, whereas timidity, fear, and cowardliness will surely lead to defeat.

In these dreadful times, don’t be shamed into silence. Follow Isaiah’s lead and raise your voice like a trumpet — awake and arise! (58:1; 60:1).

Can We Handle the Truth?

America today is a lot like Israel in Isaiah’s time. He painted a very vivid picture of Israel’s depravity: “You sons of the sorceress, you offspring of the adulterer and the harlot!” (57:3).

The love of the occult, magic, and divination has never been greater, nor has sexual perversion. The stench has surely reached the nostrils of God.

Isaiah lamented that they inflamed themselves “with gods under every green tree, slaying the children in the valleys, under the clefts of the rocks” (57:5).

They slaughtered their children on the altar of pleasure. Sound familiar? Did you know that rape or the loss of life of the mother is not the driving force behind abortion? The main driving force is failure to take responsibility for sexual sin. 

Blatant Sin Demands a Strong Rebuke

Many today would no doubt chide Isaiah for his apparent lack of grace and love. But God showed tremendous grace, mercy, and love while dealing with Israel. Even today, He is patient and long-suffering with us.

Although many of the prophetic books are not always in chronological order, we find in Isaiah 55 that everyone who thirsts could come to the waters and drink freely, and that those who  seek the Lord  will find Him. What an incredible promise!

In Isaiah 56, we are encouraged to seek righteousness. He then switches gears and talks about blind watchmen who cannot bark and warn the people. God loved His people so much that he would send prophetic voices to warn them. Are you listening today?

Mocking the Messenger

Sadly, instead of repenting, the people of Israel would often mock God through disobedience. Like America today, they crossed a very dangerous line — their blatant sin demanded a strong rebuke. This is why I often say that the silent pulpit is not God’s pulpit. 

Pastors, are you fulfilling your calling to warn and rebuke when warranted? If not, what is your reason from a biblical perspective?

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