Deconstructing Deconstruction: David Crowder, Faith Leaders Share Experiences to Help Christians Face the Controversy

Deconstructing Deconstruction: David Crowder, Faith Leaders Share Experiences to Help Christians Face the Controversy by Brody Carter for CBN News

As faith deconstruction grows among believers in the church, David Crowder and other faith leaders shared their experience and understanding of the movement, so the church can learn how to approach this controversial topic.

Some on the world stage have praised deconstruction as being an awakening. Others warn against the practice, calling it “dangerous,” and going against God’s Word.

Yet, David Crowder told CBN News he doesn’t see anything controversial about the topic. “Because if it’s true, it’s true,” Crowder said. “There’s no threat to examining what beliefs you’ve been handed. If they hold up, they hold up.”

Crowder is a Bible-believing, God-fearing, Christian musician who’s been on a mission to share the gospel ever since his days as a junior at Baylor University.

“So, I started with old hymns in new musical settings, and then about a year in, the pastor of the church said, ‘Hey, can you start writing some stuff to give a more organic expression to show what we’re experiencing as a group of believers?'”

He’s been writing what he calls “church music” ever since.

In public, his songs have become multi-platinum staples of worship. In private, Crowder has wrestled with his faith and journeyed through the process known as deconstruction.

“For me though, it’s what rescued me,” said Crowder. “I had to tear it down to know what truth was.”

To better understand this often-discussed subject, we spoke to Dr. Corne Bekker, Dean of Divinity at Regent University.

“Oftentimes, faith deconstruction makes use of the philosophical term ‘deconstructionism’ or deconstruction,” explained Dr. Bekker. “And it’s fundamentally based on what we believe with two fundamental assumptions: the first assumption is, that there is no absolute truth – which is somewhat problematic for us as Christians. The second assumption is that the context has more to say about our understanding of Truth, rather than truth itself.”

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