Nostradamus predictions for 2022: cannibals, robots and the rise of cryptocurrency

Nostradamus predictions for 2022: cannibals, robots and the rise of cryptocurrency By  for New York Post

As the year comes to a close, the news is getting grimmer, folks — at least according to the prophecies of long-dead divining daddy Nostradamus. The French plague doctor, astrologer and seer published his famed and widely quoted book “Les Prophéties” in 1555. Chock full of poetic predictions, the book foretells the coming of wars, natural disasters, assassinations, nuclear attacks and revolutions.

Aptly referred to as the Prophet of Doom by his contemporaries, Nostradamus was far from sunny in his future outlook. Inspired by biblical texts and his own plague time trauma, his prose is heavy with words like pestilence, famine, blood, sorrow and fire — and mostly reads like a bedtime story written by a Norwegian black-metal band.

Much like the high-on-fumes oracle at Delphi, Nostradamus’ predictions are intentionally vague and open to myriad interpretations. For 2021, he alluded to the onset of a zombie apocalypse, writing, “Few young people: half-dead to give a start.” Bleak, right? Not if you consider the possibility that Nos was warning us young folk that we are not really living, man, but simply existing. More Matthew McConaughey pep talk than certain quasi-death, dig? He also prophesied that 2021 would bring about a world-ending asteroid that so far (she types with abject trepidation) has yet to make an impact.

So it is with a pocketful of dread — and a thimbleful of skepticism — that we take a look at what that bearded harbinger of ruin forecast for 2022.

Inflation, starvation and cannibalism? 

Nostradamus predicted that inflation and starvation will befall us in 2K22, writing, “So high the price of wheat/That man is stirred/His fellow man to eat in his despair.” An essential human truth is that people get hungry and then they get mean — and with US inflation the highest it’s been in nearly four decades, Nos’ warning proves, so far, so true. No word on whether the rising price of wheat inspired this guy or this guyto take a bite out of their fellow man.

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