We Just Witnessed The Largest One Year Increase In Murder In The History Of The United States

We Just Witnessed The Largest One Year Increase In Murder In The History Of The United States by  for The Economic Collapse Blog

Our violent, blood-soaked culture has produced a violent, blood-soaked reality in our streets.  The final numbers for 2020 have finally been released by the FBI, and they are stunning.  Prior to last year, the largest one year increase in the murder rate in the United States was 12.7 percent, and that came all the way back in 1968.  Needless to say, many of you that are reading this article were not even alive in 1968.  Well, we didn’t just break the old record last year.  We more than doubled it.  According to the FBI’s annual report on crime, the nationwide murder rate was up about 29 percent in 2020…

The United States in 2020 experienced the biggest rise in murder since the start of national record-keeping in 1960, according to data gathered by the FBI for its annual report on crime.

The Uniform Crime Report will stand as the official word on an unusually grim year, detailing a rise in murder of around 29%. The previous largest one-year change was a 12.7% increase in 1968.

Let that sink in for a minute.

Never before in U.S. history has the murder rate shot up so rapidly.

And guess what?

The murder rate is even higher this year than it was last year.

According to the New York Times, so far in 2021 the murder rate in our largest cities is almost 10 percent higher than it was during the same period in 2020…

The evidence from big cities suggests murder is still up in 2021 relative to 2020, although the increase is not nearly as big. My collection of data from 87 cities with publicly available year-to-date data shows murder up by 9.9 percent relative to comparable points in 2020.

That means that the violence in our inner cities has gotten even worse.

So why is this happening?

In an editorial for USA Today, a former deputy police commissioner linked the rise in violent crime to a lack of policing

After the George Floyd protests started in New York City, the New York Police Department logged 45,000 fewer arrests from June to December — a 38% decline while the Big Apple added more than 100 additional homicides (a 58% increase).

From June through the end of this February, Chicago’s police made 31,000 fewer arrests — a 53% decline as murders rose 65%. In Louisville, where massive unrest included the shooting of two police officers during a protest, homicides jumped 87% as the police made 35% fewer vehicle stops since June while arrests plummeted 42% during summer months compared with 2019.

From Los Angeles and Houston to New Orleans and Minneapolis, the political response to the unrest lead to de-policing and the resulting record violence.

This trend toward less aggressive policing was a direct result of the George Floyd tragedy and the ensuing protests.

Nobody wants to become the next police officer that makes national news, and so police all over the nation have become much more cautious.

As a result, violent criminals now have much more freedom to operate, and they are taking advantage of it.

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