What To Expect When You Have to Evacuate

What To Expect When You Have to Evacuate by SARA TIPTON for Ready Nutrition

As Louisiana begins the cleanup from the mess Hurricane Ida caused, many residents are wondering if they will even have a home to go back to. The governor has urged all evacuees not to come back, but many are at a point where they can no longer afford to stay away from home.

As Louisiana begins the cleanup from the mess Hurricane Ida caused, many residents are wondering if they will even have a home to go back to. The governor has urged all evacuees not to come back, but many are at a point where they can no longer afford to stay away from home.

When disaster strikes, it is the uncertainty that is the most difficult thing to come to terms with. There is no concrete plan, just a hope that there is something to return to and something that can be salvaged. But, if you have to evacuate, where should you go? How far should go away from your home? The further, the more uncertain, the closer, the more dangerous.

WHERE AND HOW FAR TO EVACUATE

FEMA recommends that a safe evacuation route from a hurricane should take you 20-50 miles inland. For many Louisiana residents, they went to neighboring states to sit the storm out. Now that state officials are estimating that power will not be restored for weeks, and have said there will be continued gas and supply disruptions, many people are beginning to realize that this is a longer-term situation.

Think about the amount of money it would take to live in a hotel and eat out for two weeks or even a full month. In an article on the subject published by NPR,  a seven-day evacuation could cost $2,000!

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