U.S. law authorizes secretive, national ‘exercises’ against public health threats

U.S. law authorizes secretive, national ‘exercises’ against public health threats by Robert L. Kinney, III for Life Site News

A pandemic law passed by Congress in 2019 grants broad authority for the government to use ‘national’ drills without notice ‘respond’ to alleged pandemic threats.

A 2019 federal law raises concerns that the U.S. government may be engaging in large-scale COVID-19 ‘drills’ without alerting the public.

Previous articles mentioned that leading up to the reported COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. federal government made multiple actions on laws governing pandemics, including U.S. laws governing pandemic preparedness “drills and exercises.”

This article will focus on the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019, which was passed by Congress and signed into law on June 24, 2019, only a few months before COVID-19. That law describes requirements for the National Health Security Strategy 2019-2022.

Within the 2019 U.S. Pandemic Act and other laws and documents, one may find language that can be interpreted as potential tip-offs that the U.S. government may have intended to coordinate with international governments and other entities to “convene” a falsified pandemic or somewhat covert pandemic “drill” or “operational exercise.”

The information may be seen as additional support for the claim that the COVID-19 pandemic may be partially or completely falsified.

Pandemic Act enhances gov’t legal authority to prepare for pandemics

A previous article briefly discussed the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019 (henceforth referred to as the “Pandemic Act of 2019”). There may be much more to the Pandemic Act of 2019, and the legal authority it provides, that needs to be discussed. A U.S. federal government summary explains that the Pandemic Act of 2019

amends the Public Health Service Act to build on work the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has undertaken to advance national health security. Amendments include enhancing the authorities of the Secretary [of the Department of Health and Human Services], Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response [ASPR], and the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies. (emphasis added)

Thus, the Pandemic Act of 2019 amends the Public Health Service Act and enhances the authorities of several persons and entities “to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies.” Separately, the U.S. government explains that the Public Health Service Act

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