Welcome AMERICA to the Venezuela election experience

Welcome AMERICA to the Venezuela election experience by Elda Primera for The Gateway Pundit

In principle, when it comes to fraudulent elections, Venezuelans have an experience that should be unrepeatable for other nations.

The terrible Venezuelan experience keeps millions of people subject to an oppressive regime that makes them live on the edge of misery with human rights violations of all kinds. The free and fair elections in Venezuela are predetermined, and the fair and free vote is little more than another false promise from a Socialist syndicate.

In 1998 the late Hugo Chavez won a disputed National Presidential election with 56.2% of the vote, then was reelected in 2000 with 58.2% of the vote, survived a recall referendum in 2004 with 59.25% support, and was reelected again in 2006 with 62.8%, before winning a fourth term in 2012 with only 55.1% of the vote.

Before being sworn into office on January 10, 2013, Hugo Chavez died of cancer, and vice president Nicolas Maduro assumed office as a special presidential election was to be held. In this election Nicolas Maduro suspiciously won by 1.5%, narrowly defeating a center-right candidate Henrique Capriles Radonski (later formerly banished from holding any political office for 15 years due to insubordination in regards to failing to acknowledge Nicolas Maduro’s legitimate election victory).

In the Venezuelan experience, once a President wins an election under suspicious circumstances, it seems the politico stays in power for life, and the party stays in power forever.

Smartmatic electric voting systems was founded by three Venezuelan engineers and incorporated in Delaware.  Smartmatic established its headquarters in Boca Raton, Florida. The Miami Herald has reported that the Government of Venezuela may own up to 28% of Smartmatic, through an acquisition of another company named Bizta, and operated by two of the same owners of Smartmatic. Other reports say Bizta has repurchased those shares from Smartmatic.  Regardless, Smartmatic and Bizta partnered with Venezuela telephone giant CANTV to supply Venezuela with voting machines and software as far back as 2004.

Venezuela’s laws were established, in fairness, before the Hugo Chavez election.  The laws stated automated voting was required in its Venezuela national election. Smartmatic was one of several firms that retrofitted gambling machines into electronic voting booths.  Smartmatic was a little known firm, with virtually no experience in voting technology, with financial backing from the socialist government, and was selected as the vendor shortly before Hugo Chavez survived a very contentious recall referendum.

In elections that lack integrity, public sentiment does not reflect the outcome, and it seems as though the winning party continues to always win elections by increasing margins, providing even greater mandates for more power, regardless of the public sentiment.

The political Enrique Aristeguieta says in every election and especially in Venezuela, if you vote electronically, massive fraud is possible. In his opinion, electronic voting should be prohibited unless it is absolutely shielded.  Aristeguieta is confident that the truth will emerge eventually, but perhaps not soon.

The Smartmatic controversies

The Smartmatic company participated in 14 elections in Venezuela, installing more than half a million voting machines and processing more than 377 million totally controversial votes.

In Venezuela, deputy Julio Borges denounced that the system did not prevent irregularities during the recall referendum. However, the process was validated by international observers. Though it is unclear if the International Observers had the education and technological knowledge to observe software irregularities in the voting machines.

Losing candidates in the Philippines, another country Smartmatic has produced disputed results, also denounced fraud in elections managed irregularly by Smartmatic. In addition, Smartmatic was denounced in 2019 in Argentina for voting errors and inconsistent results.

However, in the constituent elections held in 2017, it was the first time that the company came into conflict with the Venezuelan authorities.

The Venezuelan company Smartmatic was accused of having close ties to the late Hugo Chávez by the opposition to the current Maduro regime. Perhaps it was the relationship with Chavez Venezuelan government that led Smartmatic to distance themselves to access new markets. It should be noted that Antonio Mugica CEO of Smartmatic declared inconsistent results in Venezuela after the elections.

Smartmatic vs Dominion

According to the attorney and international analyst, Giulio Cellini, the accusations made in the United States by President Trump regarding the possibility of fraud are concerning. In Cellini’s view, this is not a massive fraud but rather eventual irregularities that could constitute fraud if proven in some states.

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