Dill oil: The wonder oil you haven’t tried yet

Dill oil: The wonder oil you haven’t tried yet from Mercola

Once considered as a magic potion, dill oil is an essential oil that does wonders for all ages, from babies who suffer colic to mothers who want to increase their milk production. In this article, I’ll discuss about the many uses and benefits of dill oil.

What is dill oil?

In the olden times, Romans applied dill oil topically before charging into battle because they believed that it could reduce nervousness and stress. It was also believed that the oil can protect against witchcraft as well as used as an ingredient for love potions.1 Today, dill oil is known for its versatility; it has a number of properties ranging from antioxidant and antifungal to antibacterial. This essential oil is usually used for digestive support, specifically for indigestion or constipation.2

Dill, the plant from which dill oil is obtained, has two variants: Anethum graveolens (European dill), which is cultivated in England, Germany, Romania, Turkey, USA, and Russia and Anethum Sowa (Indian dill), which is cultivated in many parts of India as a cold weather crop.

There are two types of dill oil: dill seed oil and dill weed oil. The former is obtained from the mature seeds through steam distillation, and the latter is obtained through steam distillation of fresh herbs.

The two types of dill oil also differ in odor and color. While the color of dill seed oil is a slightly yellowish to light brown liquid, dill weed oil is a pale yellow to yellow liquid. The dill seed oil is known for its caraway-like aroma because it has a higher carvone content compared to dill weed oil. Dill weed oil, on the other hand, emits a strong, fresh and somewhat spicy aromatic odor.3

Uses of dill oil

There are several uses of dill oil, but it is popularly used in medicine, food, perfume and soap manufacturing because of its pleasant aroma. It’s known for its healing properties, such as:

Antimicrobial — It contains a high concentration of carvone.

Antispasmodic — Its relaxing and calming effect can help pacify spasmodic attacks.

Sedative — It also has a sedating effect that may aid in inducing drowsiness.

Dill oil also promotes milk production for nursing mothers as helps treat breast congestion due to nursing.4 When mixed in lotions or creams, dill oil can be used to help heal wounds. I also recommend using it in vapor therapy for calming the nerves and relieving tension.

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